oceanic intrigue 08 / 26, open culture bottle project

Bottle Launch On September 21, 2016 from the North Sea, off the coast of a town called Larvik, on the south coast of Norway, about 2-hour drive from Oslo. My aunt, Ann Haraldstad,  threw this bottle (or flaskepost in Norwegian) around 4:15 P.M. 
 
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NYPL

THE

BRITISH

LIBRARY

NYPL

THE

BRITISH

PUBLIC

LIBRARY

 

THE

WELLCOME COLLECTION

RIJKSMUSEUM

 

Wiki-

pedia

Image Key *UNDER CONSTRUCTION* for component parts of the collage. Click the shapes to see and learn more about the images used.

ref. L0035474

 
 

Vision

This flaskposte (Norwegian for "message-in-a-bottle") was thrown by my dear aunt Ann Haraldstad off the coast of Norway into the North Sea. Thrown on September 21, 2016 around 4:15 PM. This collage, Oceanic Intrigue, for the letter "O", was inspired by the children on a getaway fish, somehow oddly reminiscent of James Bond on a jet ski to me.
In the children's illustration sections of various open-source imagery, there are a lot of charming illustrations of kids by the sea. The first sea I have actual memories of swimming in as a 3-year-old was the Atlantic, off Wasque Beach on Chappaquiddick, Massachusetts. I remember being sans culottes, utterly free of gravity in the greenish glowing sea, sun beaming down, seeing my mom on the beach as I bobbed up and down by myself in the salty waves.
The photo on the bottom right of the collage is one I took of a driftwood sea monster at Wasque about 5 years ago. So reading the image left to right, there is a sense of blithe, childlike innocence, an unfettered joy and simple tranquility; but it's presaged by the looming complexities of growing up, in the form of a duo of ominous fish following sleekly and and relentlessly forward. This is emphasized by the Japanese characters, Ashinaga ("Long-legs") and Tenaga ("Long-arms"), strange fisherman with long limbs, symbolic of a change into bad weather, and the walrus skeleton a harbinger of the end of the cycle before its energy renews again.