bathypelagic grief 16 / 26, open culture bottle project

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Bathypelagic Grief Images
Bottle Launch Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada by Dawn George on October 30, 2016 at 2 pm. The bottle was launched from the rocky shores of Margaretsville, Nova Scotia into the Bay of Fundy 45° 2' N, 65° 3' W. High tide that day was at 12:35pm at 31.5ft so the tide was going out when the launch was conducted, low tide was at 6:55pm at 4.3ft. Tides in the Bay of Fundy are the most extreme in the world, reaching up to 53 feet (16 meters) at certain times of the year!!!
 
 
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Found? If you found this bottle, please use the form below to contact me with photographic proof, date, time, and place. Then I'll be able to update this section with your FOUND information, including photos. Thank you!

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Vision

Bathypelagic Grief was thrown from high tide at the Bay of Fundy today by my sweet friend Dawn George. Tides at the Bay of Fundy are the most extreme in the world, reaching up to 53 feet!!!
This bottle, for the letter "B", is about an existential sadness at the state of the ravaged oceans around the world. Nuclear waste from Fukushima, garbage, garbage, and more endless garbage littering the waterways, over-fishing, rafts of man-made chemicals from toxic sunscreens and personal products flushed into the sea. All the human abuses of this extraordinary resource sadden me. I go to the beach, and never leave without a bag of plastic garbage that I pick up at the shore.
"Bathypelagic" is from the Greek βαθύς (bathýs): deep, subaqueous; it can also be referred to the midnight zone. I think of midnight as a pivotal turning point between days. Will it all go to hell at dawn's early break–Homer's "wine dark seas" transformed into the color of something putrid and toxic, or will we actually be able to put the brakes on this relentless destruction of our seas, oceans, lakes, rivers, and underground reservoirs?
This bottle throw about bathypelagic grief was thrown, coincidentally, at a time of great unrest on American soil about the future of the sanctity of water, tension about refusing potentially explosive pipeline snakes across sacred territory, abuse of indigenous people, and our exploitation of the Earth's resources generally. Yep, I'm getting up on my soapbox on this one, and no apologies. #noDAPL.